• criminal behavior, legal processes, law enforcement, court management, and correctional treatments
  • attempt to explain crime and criminal behavior at the societal and individual level
  • think critically and creatively about crime and other social problems
  • develop empirically-supported solutions to these problems
  • are committed to the search for truth and societal justice
  • enjoy sociology
  • law enforcement
  • investigative and correctional agencies
  • municipal, state, and federal court systems
  • law school
  • public administration

Department Mission:

Criminal Justice, with its foundation in the social sciences, is a multidisciplinary field that looks to the liberal arts and Catholic intellectual tradition to explore the history, philosophy, and practice of the criminal justice system in America. At the Abbey, we aim to help Criminal Justice majors, as future practitioners and citizens, continue to develop their sense of community and ethics with regard to the administration of law, under the guiding principle that God be glorified in all things.

Departmental Goals:

Criminal Justice majors will

  • Develop a knowledge of the building blocks of the criminal justice system
  • Explore criminological research in an attempt to understand crime and criminal behavior
  • Acquire an ability to think critically and creatively about crime and other social problems
  • Develop empirically-supported solutions to these problems
  • Strengthen their oral and written communication skills
  • Explore the ethical issues surrounding the professional field of criminal justice
To be eligible for acceptance into the program, the student must have completed CJ 201 with a grade of C or better. Students may submit an Intent to Declare form after they have successfully completed CJ 201. To graduate with a degree in Criminal Justice, the student must have a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.0 in the major. In addition to the other Core Curriculum requirements, the following are specific core requirements:

Major Requirements:

  • CJ 201* – Introduction to Criminal Justice
  • CJ 300 – Law Enforcement in the United States
  • CJ 304 – Institutional and Community Corrections
  • CJ 360 – American Criminal Courts
  • CJ 307 – Research Methods I
  • CJ 308 – Research Methods II
  • CJ 414 – Criminology
  • CJ 403 – Ethics in CJ Systems
  • CJ 408W – Senior Thesis (fall semester)
  • CJ Electives and/or Internships**

Other Courses

  • Social Science Division Courses: 3 PC/PO/SO Electives
  • General Elective courses

*CJ 201 is a prerequisite for all upper-level CJ coursework for all students, including those pursuing a major or minor in Criminal Justice.

** Students must complete a minimum of 9 hours in CJ internships and/or electives. This requirement is met through one of the following options:

  1. completing three (3) CJ course electives
  2. completing two (2) CJ course electives and a 3-credit internship
  3. completing one (1) CJ course elective and a 6-credit internship

NOTE: Students must also pass the Computer Proficiency Exam or complete CS 100.

It is the student’s responsibility to see that all degree requirements for graduation are fulfilled.

  • CJ 201 – Introduction to Criminal Justice
  • CJ 300 – Law Enforcement in the United States
  • CJ 304 – Institutional and Community Corrections
  • CJ 360 – American Criminal Courts
  • CJ 414 – Criminology

NOTE: All coursework must be completed with a grade of “C” or better.

It is the student’s responsibility to see that all degree requirements for graduation are fulfilled.

Faculty:

Julia Foster Beeman - Chair and Assistant Professor of Criminal Justice, Chair of Social Sciences Division
A.A.S., Central Piedmont Community College
B.S., University of North Carolina-Charlotte
M.S., University of North Carolina-Charlotte

Dr. James Michael Botts - Assistant Professor of Criminal Justice
B.S., University of Central Arkansas
M.S., Illinois State University
Ph.D., American University

Stephen Ward - Assistant Professor of Criminal Justice
B.A., North Carolina State University
Juris Doctorate, Mercer University