• abstract reasoning and quantitative manipulation
  • apply your knowledge to a wide range of mathematics
  • develop an understanding of animate and inanimate systems
  • learn how physical laws shed light on the building blocks of the world
  • have a strong background in mathematics
  • enjoy thinking critically and solving problems
  • are analytical and organized in your thought process
  • engineering
  • teaching
  • insurance actuaries
  • computer programming
  • graduate school

Department Mission:

The Mathematics and Physics Department endeavors to help students understand those disciplines as integral parts of the liberal arts and sciences. We seek to provide all students with an understanding of mathematical language and ideas, which will enable them to better handle abstract reasoning and quantitative manipulation more effectively. We also strive to give our students an appreciation of the fundamental laws that reflect the order and beauty of the physical world.

In so doing, we acquaint them with the amazingly beautiful results the language of mathematics achieves when used to express the patterns found in the natural world—which are, in Catholic thought, manifestations of divinity. By holding our students to the highest standards we prepare them to pursue advanced studies and careers with discipline, integrity, and virtue. We recognize that the qualities we want students to emulate are best taught by our setting the example through our own conduct.

Since an outlook rooted in the understanding of Mathematics and Physics is crucial in assessing many of the issues facing the world today, we strive to give our students the tools of critical analysis that will enable them to participate in public discourse as responsible citizens and to promote the common good.

Departmental Goals:

Students who acquire a B. S. in mathematics will be well versed in the fundamentals of various branches of higher mathematics. They will be suitably poised to pursue graduate studies or to begin a professional career in the many fields that employ personnel with mathematical training. The B.A. in Mathematics offers students a more diverse program of study, consistent with the aims of liberal arts education. With a greater choice of free electives, the Mathematics major appeals to a broad spectrum of students with varying interests.

The department strongly encourages mathematics majors to complete a minor in an area of interest. This exposes students to the commonalities between mathematics and other bodies of knowledge and equips Mathematics majors to pursue interdisciplinary graduate studies or careers anchored in Mathematics.

The department also offers mathematics courses for non-majors to help students achieve proficiency in both theoretical and applied mathematical thinking. For students seeking an enhanced mathematical foundation, the minor program introduces the basics of higher-level mathematics. In addition to an intellectual enrichment, a better grasp of mathematical reasoning helps students mature into members of society who possess the quantitative means to make sense of, function in, and act upon the world they inhabit.

The department also offers physics and physical science courses designed to teach students the essential laws and principles that explain and/or predict a wide variety of natural phenomena. These courses impart the empirical and conceptual methodologies that define scientific epistemology. An understanding of physical laws sheds light on the building blocks of the natural world and, as such, is helpful in understanding all animate and inanimate systems encountered in other branches of science. The content and the methods taught in these courses help to mold a mindset capable of using a rationalist framework for questioning received wisdom and formulating new ideas.

B.S. in Mathematics
(This option is available for traditional students only.) To be eligible for acceptance into the degree program, the student must have completed MA 201, and must have earned a grade of “C” or better. In addition to the other Core Curriculum requirements, the following are specific core requirements:

  • MA 152 – Trigonometry (or demonstrated proficiency in the subject)

Major requirements:

  • MA 201 – Calculus I
  • MA 202 - Calculus II
  • MA 203 - Calculus III
  • MA 208 - Statistics
  • MA 222 - Discrete Mathematics
  • MA 311 - Elementary Linear Algebra
  • MA 321 - Differential Equations
  • MA 419 - Modern Algebra
  • MA 430 - Real Analysis
  • MA 490 - Senior Seminar I
  • MA 491 - Senior Seminar II

Any two from among the following:

  • MA 235 - History of Mathematics
  • MA 305 - Advanced Statistics
  • MA 335 - Advanced Calculus
  • MA 340 - Numerical Analysis
  • MA 405 - Topology
  • MA 410 - Elementary Number Theory
  • MA 415 - Partial Differential Equations
  • MA 420 - Geometry
  • MA 435 - Complex Analysis
  • CS 325 - Logic and Algorithms
  • CS 361 - Computer Modeling and Simulation

Other Courses

Students complete one of the following course combinations to meet the remainder of the 120 hours required for the degree:

  • PY 201 with PY 202 and 22-25 hours of General Electives
  • CH 105 and CH 106 with 22-25 hours of General Electives
  • Two lab-based Biology courses at the 200 level or higher with 22-25 hours of General Electives
  • CS 201 and CS 234 with 23-26 hours of General Electives

Note: Although an internship is not required, it is strongly recommended.

It is the student’s responsibility to see that all degree requirements for graduation are fulfilled.

B.A. in Mathematics
(This option is available for traditional students only.) To be eligible for acceptance into the degree program, the student must have completed MA 201, and must have earned a grade of “C” or better. In addition to the other Core Curriculum requirements, the following are specific core requirements:

  • MA 152 – Trigonometry (or demonstrated proficiency in the subject)

Major requirements:

  • MA 201 - Calculus I
  • MA 202 - Calculus II
  • MA 203 - Calculus III
  • MA 208 - Statistics
  • MA 222 - Discrete Mathematics
  • MA 311 - Elementary Linear Algebra
  • MA 321 - Differential Equations
  • MA 419 - Modern Algebra
  • MA 430 - Real Analysis
  • MA 490 - Senior Seminar I
  • MA 490 - Senior Seminar II

Any one of the following:

  • MA 235 - History of Mathematics
  • MA 305 - Advanced Statistics
  • MA 335 - Advanced Calculus
  • MA 340 - Numerical Analysis
  • MA 405 - Topology
  • MA 410 - Elementary Number Theory
  • MA 415 - Partial Differential Equations
  • MA 420 - Geometry
  • MA 435 - Complex Analysis
  • CS 325 - Logic and Algorithms
  • CS 361 - Computer Modeling and Simulation

Other Courses:

  • General Elective hours

Note: Although an internship is not required, it is strongly recommended.

It is the student’s responsibility to see that all degree requirements for graduation are fulfilled.

Concentration in Actuarial Science

Students majoring in mathematics may elect to concentrate in Actuarial Science. This concentration is also available in the Business program.

Required Courses for Actuarial Science Concentration:

  • MA 201 – Calculus I
  • MA 202 - Calculus II
  • MA 203 - Calculus III
  • MA 208 - Statistics
  • MA 305 - Advanced Statistics
  • EC 201 - Introductory Economics I
  • EC 202 - Introductory Economics II
  • BU 310 - Finance

Any one of:

  • BU 311 - Financial Management
  • BU/EC 307 - Money and Banking I
  • BU/EC 308 - Money and Banking II
  • EC 316 - Intermediate Economics
  • EC 440 - International Economics and Finance

Students majoring in mathematics are required to complete four of the above courses (MA 201, 202, 203, 208) and may take the fifth required course (MA 305) as one of the two electives for a B.S. degree (or as the one elective requirement for B.A.). Thus, for any student majoring in mathematics, the concentration in actuarial science would only entail four additional courses, two in economics and two in finance/economics/business.

It is the student’s responsibility to see that all degree requirements for graduation are fulfilled.

Concentration in Physics

Students majoring in mathematics may elect to concentrate in Physics.

Required Courses for Physics Concentration:

  • PY 201 - General Physics I
  • PY 202 - General Physics II
  • PY 303 - Modern Physics

It is the student’s responsibility to see that all degree requirements for graduation are fulfilled.

Minor in Mathematics
  • MA 201 - Calculus I
  • MA 202 - Calculus II
  • Any two 200 level or higher mathematics courses and one 300 or higher level mathematics course or one 200 level or higher mathematics course and one 300 level or higher mathematics course and CS 325 - Logic and Algorithms.

The preponderance of the hours above MA 201 must be taken at Belmont Abbey College.

It is the student’s responsibility to see that all degree requirements for graduation are fulfilled.

Minor in Physics-Mathematics

Students majoring in Mathematics may not minor in Physics-Mathematics. The Physics-Mathematics minor is specifically for students who are not Mathematics majors.

  • MA 201 - Calculus I
  • PY 201 - General Physics I
  • PY 202 - General Physics II
  • PY 303 - Calculus-based Physics III
  • MA 202 – Calculus II or MA 208 – Statistics

The preponderance of the hours above MA 201 must be taken at Belmont Abbey College.

It is the student’s responsibility to see that all degree requirements for graduation are fulfilled.

Mathematics Education

Belmont Abbey College does not offer a degree in Mathematics Education. The following courses offered by our Department of Education, however, may be useful for Mathematics students interested in a teaching career.

  • ED 300 - Introduction to Education
  • ED 399 - Diversity in Education
  • ED 305 - Introduction to the Exceptional Child

Faculty:

Dr. Igor Strugar – Chair & Associate Professor of Mathematics/Physics Department
B.S., University of Montenegro, 1990
M.S., University of Belgrade, 1997
Ph.D., University of Toledo, 2003

Dr. Rajive Tiwari – Professor of Physics/Coordinator of Physics Minor
B.S., St. Stephens College, 1980
M.S., Rutgers University, 1986
Ph.D., Rutgers University, 1989

Stephen Brosnan – Associate Professor of Math/Physics
B.A., University of Colorado, 1980
M.S., University of Michigan, 1982

Dr. Lesley O’Connor – Assistant Professor of Mathematics
B.Sc., University of London, 1963
M.A., University of California at Los Angeles, 1967
Ph.D., University of California at Los Angeles, 1975

Margarita Eganova – Lecturer of Mathematics
B.S., Tashkent Polytechnic University, 1974
M.S., Tashkent Polytechnic University, 1974