• abstract reasoning and quantitative manipulation
  • development of an understanding of animate and inanimate systems
  • learning how physical laws shed light on the building blocks of the world

You should consider the Abbey’s Mathematics degree program if you

  • have a strong background in mathematics
  • enjoy thinking critically and solving problems
  • are analytical and organized in your thought process

Mathematics majors at Belmont Abbey College experience a challenging curriculum covering essential topics in advanced mathematics. You will be suitably poised to pursue graduate studies or to begin a professional career in the many fields that employ personnel with mathematical training.

  • benefit from challenging classes such as real analysis, linear and abstract algebra, calculus and differential geometry
  • explore other math-related concepts in two semesters of chemistry, biology, physics or computer science
  • broaden your base of liberal arts knowledge as the B.A. in mathematics offers students a slightly more diverse program of study, allowing for them to take more classes outside of the department

Belmont Abbey’s mathematics department strongly encourages mathematics majors to complete a minor in an area of interest. This is important for those mathematics majors who wish to pursue interdisciplinary graduate studies or careers anchored in mathematics.

With a Mathematics bachelor’s degree from Belmont Abbey College, you will be able to pursue a variety of career opportunities, including:

  • engineering
  • teaching
  • actuarial science
  • computer programming
  • graduate school
  • statistics
  • business
  • physics
  • finance
  • computer science

With a constant demand for mathematicians in fields like business or engineering, mathematics majors are well prepared to pursue a wide range of jobs or careers. A mathematics degree from Belmont Abbey College entails a liberal arts core and approach to mathematics, giving our graduates a broad and dynamic grounding for their math pursuits.

The Abbey Difference:

Guided by the tenets of Catholicism and the Benedictine hallmarks, Belmont Abbey College strives to provide its students with a well-rounded education that promotes wise and ethical decisions.

The Mathematics and Physics Department endeavors to help students understand mathematical language and ideas, which will promote abstract reasoning and quantitative literacy. We also strive to give our students an appreciation of the fundamental laws that reflect the order and beauty of the physical world.

Since an understanding of Mathematics and Physics is crucial in assessing many of the issues facing the world today, we strive to give our students the tools of critical analysis that will enable them to participate in public discourse as responsible citizens and to promote the common good.

Our students will also be prepared for successful careers in all fields which require an understanding of Mathematics and Science.

Highlights of your experience:

This course focuses on mechanics which is a study of motion and their causes. The course also covers ideas of force, energy, momentum and thermodynamics.
This is an introduction to Calculus, a foundational branch of mathematics. Calculus has numerous applications in physics dealing with analyzing and predicting the behavior of physical systems.

Mathematics Resources:

The Belmont Abbey Math club promotes an interest in Mathematics on campus by sponsoring a variety of Math-related activities. These include student and faculty presentations and trips to Mathematical Association meetings. We also sponsor participation in the annual Putnam exam. The club meets approximately once per month and is open to all Belmont Abbey students and faculty.

Mathematics tutoring is offered for all Mathematics, Physics, and Physical Science courses in the Academic Resource Center. Tutors include both faculty and Mathematics students. Tutoring is free and is open to all Belmont Abbey College students. Mathematics, Physics and Physical Science tutoring is also available at the Charlotte campus.

Program Requirements

(This option is available for traditional students only.) To be eligible for acceptance into the degree program, the student must have completed MA 201, and must have earned a grade of “C” or better. In addition to the other Core Curriculum requirements, the following are specific core requirements:

  • MA 152 Trigonometry (or demonstrated proficiency in the subject)

Major requirements:

  • MA 201 Calculus I
  • MA 202 Calculus II
  • MA 203 Calculus III
  • MA 208 Statistics
  • MA 222 Discrete Mathematics
  • MA 311 Elementary Linear Algebra
  • MA 321 Differential Equations
  • MA 419 Modern Algebra
  • MA 430 Real Analysis
  • MA 490 Senior Seminar I
  • MA 491 Senior Seminar II

Any two from among the following:

  • MA 235 History of Mathematics
  • MA 305 Advanced Statistics
  • MA 335 Advanced Calculus
  • MA 340 Numerical Analysis
  • MA 405 Topology
  • MA 410 Elementary Number Theory
  • MA 415 Partial Differential Equations
  • MA 420 Geometry
  • MA 435 Complex Analysis
  • CS 325 Logic and Algorithms
  • CS 361 Computer Modeling and Simulation

Other Courses
Students complete one of the following course combinations to meet the remainder of the 120 hours required for the degree:

  • PY 201 with PY 202 and 22-25 hours of General Electives
  • CH 105 and CH 106 with 22-25 hours of General Electives
  • Two lab-based Biology courses at the 200 level or higher with 22-25 hours of General Electives
  • CS 201 and CS 234 with 23-26 hours of General Electives

Note: Although an internship is not required, it is strongly recommended.

It is the student’s responsibility to see that all degree requirements for graduation are fulfilled.

(This option is available for traditional students only.) To be eligible for acceptance into the degree program, the student must have completed MA 201, and must have earned a grade of “C” or better. In addition to the other Core Curriculum requirements, the following are specific core requirements:

  • MA 152 Trigonometry (or demonstrated proficiency in the subject)

Major requirements:

  • MA 201 Calculus I
  • MA 202 Calculus II
  • MA 203 Calculus III
  • MA 208 Statistics
  • MA 222 Discrete Mathematics
  • MA 311 Elementary Linear Algebra
  • MA 321 Differential Equations
  • MA 419 Modern Algebra
  • MA 430 Real Analysis
  • MA 490 Senior Seminar I
  • MA 490 Senior Seminar II

Any one of the following:

  • MA 235 History of Mathematics
  • MA 305 Advanced Statistics
  • MA 335 Advanced Calculus
  • MA 340 Numerical Analysis
  • MA 405 Topology
  • MA 410 Elementary Number Theory
  • MA 415 Partial Differential Equations
  • MA 420 Geometry
  • MA 435 Complex Analysis
  • CS 325 Logic and Algorithms
  • CS 361 Computer Modeling and Simulation

Other Courses:

  • General Elective hours

Note: Although an internship is not required, it is strongly recommended.

It is the student’s responsibility to see that all degree requirements for graduation are fulfilled.

Students majoring in mathematics may elect to concentrate in Actuarial Science. This concentration is also available in the Business program.

Required Courses for Actuarial Science Concentration:

  • MA 201 Calculus I
  • MA 202 Calculus II
  • MA 203 Calculus III
  • MA 208 Statistics
  • MA 305 Advanced Statistics
  • EC 201 Introductory Economics I
  • EC 202 Introductory Economics II
  • BU 310 Finance

Any one of:

  • BU 311 Financial Management
  • BU/EC 307 Money and Banking I
  • BU/EC 308 Money and Banking II
  • EC 316 Intermediate Economics
  • EC 440 International Economics and Finance

Students majoring in mathematics are required to complete four of the above courses (MA 201, 202, 203, 208) and may take the fifth required course (MA 305) as one of the two electives for a B.S. degree (or as the one elective requirement for B.A.). Thus, for any student majoring in mathematics, the concentration in actuarial science would only entail four additional courses, two in economics and two in finance/economics/business.

The preponderance of these courses must be taken at Belmont Abbey College.

It is the student’s responsibility to see that all degree requirements for graduation are fulfilled.

Students majoring in mathematics may elect to concentrate in Physics.

Required Courses for Physics Concentration:

  • PY 201 General Physics I
  • PY 202 General Physics II
  • PY 303 Modern Physics

The preponderance of these courses must be taken at Belmont Abbey College.

It is the student’s responsibility to see that all degree requirements for graduation are fulfilled.

Required Courses for Minor in Mathematics:

  • MA 201 Calculus I
  • MA 202 Calculus II
  • Any two 200 level or higher mathematics courses and one 300 or higher level mathematics course or one 200 level or higher mathematics course and one 300 level or higher mathematics course and CS 325 Logic and Algorithms.

The preponderance of the hours above MA 201 must be taken at Belmont Abbey College.

It is the student’s responsibility to see that all degree requirements for graduation are fulfilled.

Students majoring in Mathematics may not minor in Physics-Mathematics. The Physics-Mathematics minor is specifically for students who are not Mathematics majors.

  • MA 201 Calculus I
  • PY 201 General Physics I
  • PY 202 General Physics II
  • PY 303 Modern Physics
  • MA 202 Calculus II or MA 208 – Statistics

The preponderance of the hours above MA 201 must be taken at Belmont Abbey College.

It is the student’s responsibility to see that all degree requirements for graduation are fulfilled.

Belmont Abbey College does not offer a degree in Mathematics Education. The following courses offered by our Department of Education, however, may be useful for Mathematics students interested in a teaching career.

  • ED 300 Introduction to Education
  • ED 399 Diversity in Education
  • ED 305 Introduction to the Exceptional Child

 

Faculty:

Dr. Igor Strugar – Chair and Associate Professor of Mathematics/Physics Department
B.S., University of Montenegro
M.S., University of Belgrade
Ph.D., University of Toledo

Dr. Rajive Tiwari – Professor of Physics/Coordinator of Physics-Mathematics Minor
B.S., St. Stephens College
M.S., Rutgers University
Ph.D., Rutgers University

Stephen Brosnan – Associate Professor of Math/Physics
B.A., University of Colorado
M.S., University of Michigan

Dr. Lesley O’Connor – Assistant Professor of Mathematics
B.S., University of London
M.A., University of California at Los Angeles
Ph.D., University of California at Los Angeles

Margarita Eganova – Lecturer of Mathematics
B.S., Tashkent Polytechnic University
M.S., Tashkent Polytechnic University