Dr. Justin B. Litke 

Assistant Professor of Government and Political Philosophy, Director Thomas More Scholarship Program

justinlitke@bac.edu

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B.A., The Catholic University of America
M.A., Georgetown University
Ph.D., Georgetown University
• Honors Seminar in Philosophy: Nature and Human Nature (HO350)
• Senior Seminar: “Interest” in the Western Canon (PO 450W)
• American Political Thought I & II (PO 361 & PO 362)
• The American Congress (PO 331)
• Constitutional Law II: Civil Rights and Civil Liberties (PO 310)
• Renaissance and Modern Political Thought (PO 212)
• Ancient and Medieval Political Thought (PO 211)
• The U.S. Constitution (PO 201)
• First Year Symposium (FS 101)
• “Publius was Right (and Henry Clay Doesn’t Matter): Federalist No. 10 and the Compromise of 1833” (2016 MPSA Annual Meeting)
• “Authority, the Classroom, and Humility: Lessons Learned from Yves Simon’s A General Theory of Authority” (A lecture inaugurating a new Exhibit of Artwork by C. M. Kakassy and a Donation of books and other materials from the library of Yves Simon, Abbot Taylor Library – Belmont Abbey College, November 11, 2015)
• “A Little Place and a Big Idea: Politics of Purpose and Scale in America” (2014 FPR Conference – “Making a Home Fit for Humans: Localism beyond Food”)
• “American Exceptionalism: What is it? Why does it matter?” (2013 B.A.C. Faculty Lecture Series)
• “Irrelevance: It’s the New Relevance (Or At Least It Should Be)” (2012 Inaugural Adron Doran Symposium on Higher Education, Morehead State University)
• “Why John Winthrop is Not the Father of American Exceptionalism” (2011 SPSA Annual Meeting)
• “American Exceptionalism as a Development in American History” (2010 NHI Annual Academic Symposium)
• “John Winthrop’s ‘City on a Hill’ as Exemplary Exceptionalism” (2010 NEPSA Annual Meeting)
• “Nature, Human Nature, and Political Theory: How Aristotle Helps to Clarify Rousseau” (2009 NPSA Annual Meeting)
• “The Paramount Importance of the ‘Other’: Catholic Political Theory and the Division of Labor” (2007 NPSA Annual Meeting)
• Twilight of the Republic: Empire and Exceptionalism in the American Political Tradition (University Press of Kentucky, 2013)

Reviews:
• American Political Thought (March 2015): “Twilight of the Republic certainly makes a rich and serious contribution to the relevant literature and should be read by anyone interested in the idea of exceptionalism and its development.” Recommended.
• Choice (April 2014): A “lively scholarly polemic;” “enthusiastically argued.” Recommended.
• The Chronicle of Higher Education (Sept. 13, 2013): “Offers a historical perspective on the idea of American exceptionalism and considers new ways forward for national identity.”
• “Varieties of American Exceptionalism: Why John Winthrop is No Imperialist”. Journal of Church and State, (Spring 2012) 54(2): 197-213.
• “Publius was Right (And Henry Clay Doesn’t Matter): Federalist No. 10 and the Compromise of 1833” (article in progress)