Dr. Mary Ellen Weir

Associate Professor of English

maryellenweir@bac.edu

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Ph.D., English, University of North Carolina-Greensboro, Greensboro, North Carolina, 1994
Major concentration: Nineteenth Century British.
Minor concentrations: Medieval, Renaissance.

MA, English, University of North Carolina-Charlotte, Charlotte, North Carolina, 1985

  • EN 330 British Victorian Writers
  • EN 205 Love in the Literary Tradition
  • EN 400 England Study Tour
  • EN 403 British Medieval Genres
  • EN 320 English Romantic Writers
  • EN 400 Love in the Literary Tradition
  • EN 404 British Medieval Genres
  • EN 211, 212 (Classic Texts in the Western Tradition)
  • RH 101, 102 (Rhetoric)
  • Poetry: Xine, 1996
  • The Sucharnoochee Review, 1990
  • Crucible, 1990, 1989
  • Agora, 1987, 1989, 1994, 1996, 1998, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2014, 2015
  • Mercy Arts, 1987
  • Sanscrit, 1985, 1986
  • Sisters Today, 1980

Scholarly:

  • Delta Epsilon Sigma Interdisciplinary Journal, Winter, 2003.“Gerard Manley Hopkins and the ‘New’ Cosmos”
  • The Belmont Abbey College Reader 2nd Ed. 2013. Introductions for Alfred, Lord Tennyson and John Keats
  •  “The New Cosmology: What Gerard Manley Hopkins Had to Say”
  •   “Converged Minds: Heraclitus, Hopkins and Teilhard in the Noosphere”
  •   “Flannery O’Connor’s ‘Good Country People’ and the Reader’s ‘Moment of Grace’”
  •  “The Agora, Simon the Shoemaker, and the Dionysian Theatre”
  • Thesis: “The Waste Land: A Positive Experience.”
  • Dissertation:
    “‘Men Call Me Chaste’: A Feminine Redefinition of Androcentric Chastity in Medieval, Renaissance, and Nineteenth Century British Texts.”
    An examination of the ways in which women writers in the medieval, Renaissance and nineteenth century British literary periods redefine androcentric chastity.
  • Wordsworth, Keats, Hopkins lectures, St. Hilda’s College, Oxford University, England, EN 400 Study Tour, July, 2005
  • Concurrent research: Gerard Manley Hopkins, William Wordsworth, John Keats, medieval  mystical writers, especially Julian of Norwich and Margery Kemp