• psychology as the scientific study of behavior, mental processes, and emotion using scientific methods, and applying such study for the promotion of human welfare
  • understand and evaluate psychological research presented in the popular press
  • understand the role of theory in psychology
  • develop research skills and understand the role of evidence in psychology
  • understand the dynamics of the human person as an individual, as a member of a family, as a member of a group, and as a member of a community
  • are fascinated by the human person, group, family, and marriage dynamics
  • are a good listener
  • comfortable with empirical data
  • recognize the inherent self-worth of the human person as created by God
  • want to help others with their problems
  • enjoy thinking logically and scientifically

Careers in…

  • business, including management and recruiting
  • team leadership
  • social services
  • criminal investigator
  • church work
  • organization behavior and human resources
  • education

Graduate training in…

  • psychology
  • counseling
  • medicine
  • allied health
  • pastoral guidance
  • law

Department Mission:

In accordance with the Catholic, Benedictine, and liberal arts traditions, the Psychology Department supports students’ learning of the cumulative knowledge base and methods central to psychology within a framework of ethical principles and integration of knowledge. Our commitment is to educate the whole student effectively, integrating the intellectual, behavioral, spiritual, and emotional aspects inherent in the scientific study of behavior, mental processes, and emotion, and the application of psychological science to the promotion of human welfare. Regardless of the career path taken by our students after graduation, our goal is to enable them to think clearly and act with integrity in their professional, public, and personal lives.

Departmental Goals:

Students majoring in psychology will:

  1. Develop knowledge, skills, and values consistent with the science and application of psychology
  2. Critically evaluate the production, interpretation, and application of psychological research to understand the human person and promote human welfare
  3. Understand the philosophical and historical background of psychology
  4. Embrace opportunities for practical professional experiences and career exploration

Standards for Admission and Graduation:

To be eligible for acceptance into any psychology major, the student must have earned a “C” or better in PC 201 and one upper-level psychology course, and must have an overall GPA of 2.5 or better. Transfer students must meet with a department advisor before declaring the major. While all courses in psychology require basic computer competencies, competencies specific to the discipline will be addressed in PC 307W, PC 410W, and PC 412W. Students must have a “C” or better in all of their PC courses and SS 300 to graduate with a degree in psychology. For the majors and for the minors, the preponderance of the credit hours must be taken at Belmont Abbey College.

Degrees Offered

The department offers students a choice of earning a B.S. in Psychology, a B.A. in Psychology, or a B.A. in Applied Psychology (Adult Degree Program students only). The B.S. emphasizes biological psychology and the connections between psychology and the natural sciences and mathematics. The B.A. focuses on the connections among psychology, other social sciences, and the humanities. The B.A. in Applied Psychology focuses on the application of psychology to solve problems and promote human welfare.

Students who complete any of the department’s undergraduate programs will be eligible to compete for acceptance into graduate programs or into post baccalaureate employment in the health and human services fields, industries and businesses, and educational organizations. Students who wish to become professional psychologists—whether in clinical, research, or academic settings—must complete a Bachelor’s degree, and subsequently, either a Master’s or Doctoral degree.

B. A. in Psychology

(This option is available for traditional students only.) In addition to the other Core Curriculum requirements, the following are specific core requirements:

  • PC 201- Introductory Psychology
  • MA 135 or higher (prerequisite for SS 300)

Major requirements:
At least three (3) of the following:

  • PC 301 – Developmental Psychology
  • PC 306 – Cognitive Psychology
  • PC 308 – Theories of Personality
  • PC 360 – Social and Cultural Psychology

Each of the following:

  • PC 307 – Research Methods for Psychology (spring of Junior year)
  • PC 313 – Abnormal Psychology
  • PC 400 – History and Systems of Psychology
  • PC 407 – Testing and Assessment
  • PC 410 – Senior Thesis (fall of Senior year)
  • PC upper-level electives
  • SS 300 – Fundamental Statistics for Social Science (fall of Junior year)

Other Courses :

  • Nine (9) hours of courses from departments others than Psychology
  • Internship is encouraged
  • General elective hours (taking a minor is encouraged)

It is the student’s responsibility to see that all degree requirements for graduation are fulfilled.

Notes

To be eligible for the senior capstone course (PC 410, PC 411, PC412), students must have earned a “C” or better in SS 300 and in PC 307W. Please see course description for other prerequisites.

Although an internship is not required, it is strongly recommended for (and counts as) a PC upper-level elective for the B. A. in Psychology, B. S. in Psychology and the minor in Applied Psychology. Under certain circumstances, the internship may count as a PC upper-level elective for the B. A. in Applied Psychology and the minor in Psychology; please consult with department advisor.

SS 300 is a prerequisite for PC 307 (taken in the spring of the junior year) and for PC 407. PC 307 is a prerequisite for PC 410 (taken senior year), And, PC 407 is a prerequisite for PC 411, which is taken in the fall semester of the senior year.)

B. S. in Psychology
(This option is available for traditional students only.) In addition to the other Core Curriculum requirements, the following are specific core requirements:

  • PC 201- Introductory Psychology
  • MA 135 or higher (prerequisite for SS 300)

Major requirements:
At least two (2) of the following:

  • PC 301 – Developmental Psychology
  • PC 306 – Cognitive Psychology
  • PC 308 – Theories of Personality
  • PC 360 – Social and Cultural Psychology

Each of the following:

  • PC 305 - Biological Psychology
  • PC 307 – Research Methods for Psychology (spring of Junior year)
  • PC 313 – Abnormal Psychology
  • PC 400 – History and Systems of Psychology
  • PC 407 – Testing and Assessment
  • PC 410 – Senior Thesis (fall of Senior year)
  • PC upper-level electives
  • SS 300 – Fundamental Statistics for Social Science (fall of Junior year)

Other Courses :

  • BI, EV, CH, or MA courses beyond core requirements
  • Internship is encouraged
  • General elective hours (taking a minor is encouraged)

It is the student’s responsibility to see that all degree requirements for graduation are fulfilled.

Notes

To be eligible for the senior capstone course (PC 410, PC 411, PC412), students must have earned a “C” or better in SS 300 and in PC 307W. Please see course description for other prerequisites.

Although an internship is not required, it is strongly recommended for (and counts as) a PC upper-level elective for the B. A. in Psychology, B. S. in Psychology and the minor in Applied Psychology. Under certain circumstances, the internship may count as a PC upper-level elective for the B. A. in Applied Psychology and the minor in Psychology; please consult with department advisor.

SS 300 is a prerequisite for PC 307 (taken in the spring of the junior year) and for PC 407. PC 307 is a prerequisite for PC 410 (taken senior year), And, PC 407 is a prerequisite for PC 411, which is taken in the fall semester of the senior year.)

B.A. in Applied Psychology

(This option is available for Adult Degree Program students only.) Any ADP student who has not previously attended college or has not been enrolled full-time during the past three (3) years must enroll in AD101 Adult to College Transition. In addition to the other Core Curriculum requirements, the following are specific core requirements:

  • PC 201 – Introductory Psychology
  • MA 135 or higher (prerequisite for SS 300)

Major requirements1:

  • PC 215W – Science and Practice of Psychology
  • SS 300 – Fundamental Statistics for Social Science
  • PC 313 (prev. PC 403) – Abnormal Psychology
  • PC 307W – Research Methods for Psychology
  • PC 400 – History and Systems of Psychology
  • PC 407 – Testing and Assessment2
  • PC 412W/411 – Senior Seminar or Practicum
  • PC upper-level electives3

At least one (1) of the following:

  • PC 301 – Developmental Psychology
  • PC 360 – Social Psychology
  • PC 306 – Cognitive Psychology
  • PC308 – Theories of Personality
  • PC 305 (prev. PC 405) – Biological Psychology

At least one (1) of the following:

  • PC 303 – Special Topics in Applied Psychology
  • PC 320 – Introduction to School Psychology
  • PC 330 – Industrial/Organizational Psychology
  • PC 340 – Sport Psychology
  • PC 404 – Seminar in Counseling
  • Or another applied psychology course approved by department chair

Other Courses :

  • Supplemental cluster of 200+ (beyond core) courses from a department other than PC 9 hours
  • General elective hours (taking a minor is encouraged) 21-24 hours

It is the student’s responsibility to see that all degree requirements for graduation are fulfilled. 

To be eligible for the senior capstone course (PC 410, PC 411, PC412), students must have earned a “C” or better in SS 300 and in PC 307W. Please see course description for other prerequisites.

Notes

1Several courses have prerequisites; please see course descriptions for other details.

2SS 300 is a prerequisite for PC 307W (taken in the spring of the junior year) and for PC 407. PC 307W is a prerequisite for PC 410W, PC411, and PC412W (senior year). PC 407 is a pre-requisite for PC 411 (senior year). PC 215W is a prerequisite for the ADP sections of PC 307W.

3Although an internship is not required, it is strongly recommended for (and counts as) a PC upper-level elective for the B.A. in Psychology, B.S. in Psychology and the minor in Applied Psychology. Under certain circumstances, the internship may count as a PC upper-level elective for the B.A. in Applied Psychology or the minor in Psychology; please consult with department chair.

Minor in Psychology

(This option is available for traditional students only.)

Minor requirements:

  • PC 201 – Introductory Psychology

Two (2) applied psychology electives from the following:

  • PC 303 – Special Topics in Applied Psychology
  • PC 320 – Introduction to School Psychology
  • PC 330 – Industrial/Organizational Psychology
  • PC 340 – Sport Psychology
  • PC 404 – Seminar in Counseling
  • PC 407 – Testing and Assessment

Other Courses :

  • Other applied psychology course approved by department chair 1
  • PC upper-level electives1

The preponderance of the courses for the minor must be taken at Belmont Abbey College.

It is the student’s responsibility to see that all degree requirements for graduation are fulfilled.

Notes

1Although an internship is not required, it is strongly recommended for (and counts as) a PC upper-level elective for the B.A. in Psychology, B.S. in Psychology and the minor in Applied Psychology. Under certain circumstances, the internship may count as a PC upper-level elective for the B.A. in Applied Psychology or the minor in Psychology; please consult with department chair.

 

Faculty:

Dr. Nathalie Coté - Chair & Associate Professor of Psychology
B.A., Furman University, 1988
M.S., Vanderbilt University, 1992
Ph.D., Vanderbilt University, 1998

Dr. Ann Calhoun-Sauls – Associate Professor of Psychology
B.A., University of North Carolina-Charlotte, 1981
M.A., University of North Carolina-Greensboro, 1984
Ph.D., University of North Carolina-Greensboro, 1989

Dr. Diana Elliott – Associate Professor of Psychology
B.S., University of New Hampshire, 1977
M.Ed., University of Houston, 1986
M.A., Biola University, 1988
Ph.D., Biola University, 1991

Dr. Joan Brugman – Assistant Professor of Psychology
B.A., College of the Holy Cross, 1985
M.S., Nova Southeastern University, 1989
Psy.D., Nova Southeastern University, 1993

Ms. Tracy Manning – Lecturer of Psychology
A.A., Grossmont Community College, 1990
B.A., San Diego State University, 1993
M.A., San Diego State University, 1996