• emphasizing behavior, mental processes, and emotion using scientific methods and applying such study for the promotion of human welfare
  • comprehension and evaluation of psychological research presented in the popular press
  • understanding the role of theory in psychology
  • developing research skills and examining the role of evidence in psychology
  • analyzing the dynamics of the human person as an individual, a member of a family, of a group, and of a community

You’ll enjoy the Abbey’s psychology major if you

  • are fascinated by the human person as well as group, family, and marriage dynamics
  • are a good listener
  • are comfortable with empirical data
  • recognize the inherent self-worth of the human person as created by God
  • want to help others with their problems
  • enjoy thinking logically and scientifically
Belmont Abbey College’s psychology bachelor’s degree program is an excellent starting place for anyone hoping to build a career in psychology.
Majors in the department will
      be familiarized with APA style, research techniques and how to conduct a credible psychological study
    • develop knowledge, skills, and values consistent with the science and application of psychology
    • critically evaluate the production, interpretation, and application of psychological research to understand the human person and promote human welfare
    • understand the philosophical and historical background of psychology
    • embrace opportunities for practical professional experiences and career exploration
With a Psychology bachelor’s degree from Belmont Abbey College, you will be able to pursue a variety of career opportunities, including:
  • Counseling
  • Psychiatrist
  • Social work
  • Clinical, forensic, or engineering psychologist
  • School or sports psychologist
  • Teaching

Psychologists are ubiquitous in a vast number of career fields, from counseling to clinical psychology to social work. Pursuing a bachelor’s degree in psychology is widely practical because knowledge of the way humans think is useful in any line of work.

The Abbey Difference:

In accordance with the Catholic, Benedictine, and liberal arts traditions, the Psychology Department supports students’ learning of the cumulative knowledge base and methods central to psychology within a framework of ethical principles and integration of knowledge. Our commitment is to educate the whole student effectively, integrating the intellectual, behavioral, spiritual, and emotional aspects inherent in the scientific study of behavior, mental processes, and emotion, and the application of psychological science to the promotion of human welfare. Regardless of the career path taken by our students after graduation, our goal is to enable them to think clearly and act with integrity in their professional, public, and personal lives.

Highlights of your experience:

Pursuing a Bachelor’s Degree in Psychology at Belmont Abbey College gives students many opportunities to participate in engaging classes, such as:

In addition to learning fundamental physiological principles that underlie normal and disordered behavior, mental processes and emotion, students engage in well-informed critical and civil discussion of how bio-psychological knowledge and principles can be used ethically to understand and influence a wide range of problems. In addition to two exams and teaching a lesson with a partner, students write a paper on Disorders of Sexual Development such as Turner Syndrome and Complete Androgen Insensitivity Syndrome (AIS) and end with a short multimedia presentation on a cutting edge topic such as sensory substitution devices or deep brain stimulation.
We regularly offer Special Topics courses. A recent favorite is PC303 Special Topics: Interpersonal Relationships in the Digital Age, an interdisciplinary course which draws on social psychology, personality psychology, communications, and ethics to examine the impact of technology on human relationships as well as the functioning and redefinition of the self. Other Special Topics have included Addiction, Forensic Psychology, and Group Dynamics.
This is a very popular course for psychology majors and minors and students from other majors. Students examine psychological theories and research that shed light on group behavior and the effects of social environments on individual behavior. Specific topics include cognitive attribution, conformity, gender roles, interpersonal relationships, and prejudice. Assignments may include not only exams and papers and class participation but also an analysis of a popular film.

Psychology Resources:

The Psychology Club occasionally co-sponsors educational programs such as Eating Disorder Awareness or national depression screening events. Educational/social events are sponsored as well, like movie nights where a film is followed by a discussion led by a psychology professor. Members of the Psychology Club also raise funds to co-sponsor the annual Central Carolinas Conference in Psychology, a local undergraduate conference put on by a partnership of BAC, UNCC, Queens, and Johnson C. Smith University. In 2013, 18 Abbey students attended the Central Carolinas Conference in Psychology on March 21 at UNCC.

The Club also raises funds to send students to a professional conference, the Southeastern Psychological Association. This year, thanks to the generosity of an alumnus and the organizational skills of the Psychology Club officers, one student presented her senior research in Nashville TN in March at the annual conference of the Southeastern Psychological Association, and two other students attended the conference.

Program Requirements:

In addition to the other Core Curriculum requirements, the following are specific core requirements:

  • PC 201- Introductory Psychology
  • MA 135 or higher (prerequisite for PC 300)

Major requirements:

  • PC 215W – Science and Practice of Psychology
  • PC 300 – Statistics for Psychology (fall)/li>
  • PC 301 – Developmental Psychology
  • PC 360 – Social Psychology
  • PC 308 – Theories of Personality
  • PC 313 – Abnormal Psychology
  • PC 307 – Research Methods for Psychology (spring of Junior year)
  • PC 313 – Abnormal Psychology
  • PC 307W- Research Methods for Psychology (Spring)
  • PC 407 – Testing and Assessment (Spring)
  • PC 400 – History and Systems of Psychology (Fall)
  • PC 410W/411W/412W- Senior capstone (Fall of senior year)
  • PC upper-level electives

Other Courses :

  • Nine (9) hours of 200+ (beyond core) courses from departments others than Psychology
  • Internship is encouraged
  • General elective hours (taking a minor is encouraged)

It is the student’s responsibility to see that all degree requirements for graduation are fulfilled.

Notes

1. Several courses have prerequisites; Please see course descriptions for other details.

2. PC 215W and PC 300 (Fall course) are prerequisite for PC 307W (Spring course) and for PC 407. PC 307W is a prerequisite for PC 410W, PC411W, and PC412W (senior year). PC 407 is a pre-requisite for PC 411W (senior year).

3. Although an internship is not required, it is strongly recommended for (and counts as) a PC upper-level elective for the B.A. in Psychology, B.S. in Psychology and the minor in Psychology.

4. Any course numbered above PC 201 is considered an upper-level PC course.

(This option is available for traditional students only.) In addition to the other Core Curriculum requirements, the following are specific core requirements:

  • PC 201- Introductory Psychology
  • MA 135 or higher (prerequisite for PC 300) (N.B.: MA 151 is often a prerequisite for students taking CH, PY, MA courses)

Major requirements:

  • PC 215W – Science and Practice of Psychology
  • PC 300 – Statistics for Psychology (Fall)
  • PC 301 – Developmental Psychology
  • PC 305 – Biological Psychology
  • PC 306 – Cognitive Psychology
  • PC 360 – Social OR PC 308 Theories of Personality
  • PC 313 – Abnormal Psychology
  • PC 307W – Research Methods for Psychology (Spring)
  • PC 407 – Testing and Assessment (Spring)
  • PC 400 – History and Systems of Psychology (Fall)
  • PC 410W/411W/412W – Senior capstone (Fall of senior year)
  • PC upper-level electives
  • Other Courses :

    • BI, EV, CH, or MA courses beyond core requirements
    • Internship is encouraged
    • General elective hours (taking a minor is encouraged)

    It is the student’s responsibility to see that all degree requirements for graduation are fulfilled.

    Notes

    1. Several courses have prerequisites; Please see course descriptions for other details.

    2. PC 215W and PC 300 (Fall course) are prerequisite for PC 307W (Spring course) and for PC 407. PC 307W is a prerequisite for PC 410W, PC411W, and PC412W (senior year). PC 407 is a pre-requisite for PC 411W (senior year).

    3. Although an internship is not required, it is strongly recommended for (and counts as) a PC upper-level elective for the B.A. in Psychology, B.S. in Psychology and the minor in Psychology.

    4 Any course numbered above PC 201 is considered an upper-level PC course.

The concentration in Applied Psychology is an option for students pursuing the B.A. in Psychology or the B.S. in Psychology. With careful planning, it is possible for B.A. in Psychology majors to fit the concentration into the major without additional course requirements. For B.S. majors, at least one additional course is required beyond the major requirements listed above.

Three of the following:

  • PC 303 – Special Topics in Applied Psychology
  • PC 320 – Introduction to School Psychology
  • PC 330 – Industrial/Organizational Psychology
  • PC 340 – Sport Psychology
  • PC 350 – Psychology of Addiction
  • PC 404 – Seminar in Counseling
  • Other applied psychology course approved by department chair

AND
One of the following:

  • PC 411W – Senior Practicum Seminar (Fall of senior year)
  • PC 453 – Internship

It is the student’s responsibility to see that all degree requirements for graduation are fulfilled. 

Notes

1. Several courses have prerequisites; Please see course descriptions for other details.

2. PC 215W and PC 300 (Fall course) are prerequisite for PC 307W (Spring course) and for PC 407. PC 307W is a prerequisite for PC 410W, PC411W, and PC412W (senior year). PC 407 is a pre-requisite for PC 411W (senior year).

3. Although an internship is not required, it is strongly recommended for (and counts as) a PC upper-level elective for the B.A. in Psychology, B.S. in Psychology and the minor in Psychology.

4. Any course numbered above PC 201 is considered an upper-level PC course.

Fifteen (15) credit hours of Psychology beyond the core curriculum.

Students who take PC 201 to satisfy the Social Science core curriculum requirement must take an additional 15 credit hours of upper level PC courses to earn the minor. Students who take a course other than PC 201 to satisfy the Social Science core curriculum requirement may take PC 201 and an additional 12 credit hours of upper level PC courses to earn the minor. The preponderance of the courses for the minor must be taken at Belmont Abbey College.

The preponderance of the credit hours for the minor must be taken at Belmont Abbey College.

It is the student’s responsibility to see that all degree requirements for graduation are fulfilled.

Notes

1. Several courses have prerequisites; Please see course descriptions for other details.

2. PC 215W and PC 300 (Fall course) are prerequisite for PC 307W (Spring course) and for PC 407. PC 307W is a prerequisite for PC 410W, PC411W, and PC412W (senior year). PC 407 is a pre-requisite for PC 411W (senior year).

3. Although an internship is not required, it is strongly recommended for (and counts as) a PC upper-level elective for the B.A. in Psychology, B.S. in Psychology and the minor in Psychology.

4. Any course numbered above PC 201 is considered an upper-level PC course.

 

Faculty:

Dr. Nathalie Cote– Chair & Associate Professor of Psychology
B.A., Furman University
M.S., Vanderbilt University
Ph.D., Vanderbilt University

Dr. Ann Calhoun-Sauls  – Associate Professor of Psychology
B.A., University of North Carolina-Charlotte
M.A., University of North Carolina-Greensboro
Ph.D., University of North Carolina-Greensboro

Dr. Diana Elliott – Associate Professor of Psychology
B.S., University of New Hampshire
M.Ed., University of Houston
M.A., Biola University
Ph.D., Biola University

Dr. Joan D. Brugman – Assistant Professor of Psychology
B.A., College of the Holy Cross
M.S., Nova Southeastern University
Psy.D., Nova Southeastern University

Dr. Kristina Reihl – Lecturer of Psychology
B.A., Hofstra University
M.S., Nova Southeastern University
Ph.D., Nova Southeastern University